Updates & Alerts

Updates & Alerts

Update 4/11/2014 :What is The Heartbleed Bug?

To learn more about The Heartbleed Bug, a serious vulnerability that was published in the popular OpenSSL cryptographic software library on April 7, 2014, please visit: http://heartbleed.com/.

What approach did DocuSign take upon learning of The Heartbleed Bug vulnerability?

DocuSign initiated incident response procedures on April 7 to ensure the security of all the company’s servers, core systems and online properties. Please note that DocuSign does not utilize OpenSSL for our core application, including docusign.net and app.docusign.com sites. As part of our incident response plan, we reviewed all of our sites and worked with our partners to ensure they were both aware of and responding to the Heartbleed vulnerability. No customer action is required.

Did The Heartbleed Bug access any DocuSign or customer data?

The security and safety of our data and customers’ data is a top priority for DocuSign. We take great pride, care and initiated incident response procedures, in the case of The Heartbleed Bug, to validate and ensure our systems remain safe and secure.

As a safety precaution and as a matter of best practice, passwords should be changed often. Do not use the same password on multiple sites. We recommend DocuSign users establish unique passwords.

Update 4/09/2014

On April 7th the existence of the The Heartbleed Bug as a serious security risk to websites relying on OpenSSL was announced. We would like to assure you that DocuSign does not utilize OpenSSL for its core application, including for our docusign.net and app.docusign.com sites.

Immediately upon the publication of information on Heartbleed, DocuSign initiated incident response procedures to ensure the continued security and safety of our servers, core systems and online properties. We have reviewed all of our sites and worked with our partners to ensure they are aware of and responding to the Heartbleed vulnerability. 

As a safety precaution and as a matter of best practice, we recommend all DocuSign customers periodically change passwords for all of your most critical sites and never use the same password for multiple sites. We further recommend that your DocuSign password be unique among all your passwords. 

 

Update 04/01/2014

DocuSign experienced delays in delivery of email up to 30 minutes from 9:25PDT to 2:50PDT.

 

Update 02/08/2014

DocuSign is tracking malicious email campaigns that began on 2/8/2014. In this version of malware spam email, possibly malicious third-parties are including links to non-DocuSign websites. These emails are not associated with DocuSign. They are coming from an unrelated third party using DocuSign in the subject line.  In older versions of this type of spam we have also seen .zip attachments as well as emails that attempt to copy the DocuSign email style and language in the hopes of fooling recipients into opening the email and clicking on links and attachments

Always pay attention to the URL at the top of your DocuSign log-in. A DocuSign log-in page should begin with https://www.docusign.net. Legitimate DocuSign invitations to sign and completion emails also include a security code which can be entered into the “Access Documents” section of the .com site to securely access the document.

Examples of the emails we have seen this today all have the subject line of, "Completed: Please DocuSign this document: Price Ruduction Authorization”

Please remember to be particularly cautious if you receive an invitation to sign or view for an envelope you are not expecting. If you have received a copy of the malware spam email, DO NOT CLICK ANY LINKS or OPEN ANY ATTACHMENTS. Instead, forward the email to spam@docusign.com and then immediately delete the email from your system.

As a leader in online eSignature security and compliance, DocuSign has a zero-tolerance policy for this type of malware spam email and is fully prepared to ensure minimal impact to our customers and company. As we’ve seen, this type of malicious activity is becoming more common, especially to organizations with established, trusted brands. Please note that this malicious activity has no relation to any activity DocuSign is involved.

 

Update 01/20/2014

Customer Notification: Additional IP Addresses for DocuSign Service

It’s DocuSign’s intention to provide the most robust and reliable service possible to enable your business transactions. We also want to proactively share information which may be of interest to our customers regarding the evolution of our service.   A few of our customers have elected to explicitly allow internet addresses advertised by our service.  It is important for those customers to keep up-to-date with our current IP address ranges.   The following IP address ranges will be used by our service effective February 7, 2014 and until further notification:

 
Current and Continuing
209.67.98.1 through 209.67.98.63
206.25.247.129 through 206.25.247.159
209.46.117.161 through 209.46.117.191
 
New and Incremental
162.248.184.1 through 162.248.187.255
 
These IP address ranges apply to all of our production and demo environments.  Should you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

Update 11/07/2013

DocuSign is tracking malicious email campaigns that began on 11/7/2013. In this version of malware spam email attacks, possibly malicious third parties are including .zip attachments. These emails are not associated with DocuSign. They are coming from an unrelated third party attempting to copy our email style and language in the hopes of fooling recipients into opening the email and clicking on the attachments. In other versions of this type of spam we have also seen links to non-DocuSign sites as well as the .zip attachments. Always pay attention to the URL at the top of your DocuSign log-in. A DocuSign log-in page should begin with https://www.docusign.net. Legitimate DocuSign invitations to sign and completion emails also include a security code which can be entered into the “Access Documents” section of the .com site to securely access the document.

Examples of the emails we have seen this afternoon all have the subject line of, "Please DocuSign this document: Company Changes – Internal Only”

Please remember to be particularly cautious if you receive an invitation to sign or view for an envelope you are not expecting. If you have received a copy of the malware spam email, DO NOT CLICK ANY LINKS or OPEN ANY ATTACHMENTS. Instead, forward the email to spam@docusign.com and then immediately delete the email from your system.

As a leader in online eSignature security and compliance, DocuSign has a zero-tolerance policy for this type of malware spam email and is fully prepared to ensure minimal impact to our customers and company. As we’ve seen, this type of malicious activity is becoming more common, especially to organizations with established, trusted brands. Please note that this malicious activity has no relation to any activity DocuSign is involved.

Update 10/15/2013

At approximately 5:30PM PST, DocuSign’s service partner call center in the Philippines experienced a 7.2 magnitude earthquake. The DocuSign service partner team in the Philippines is responsible for all Tier 1 customer support activities, and is currently unavailable. We have been in communication with our service partner (SupportSave). They have informed us that all of our Tier 1 representatives are safe and accounted for. The DocuSign Customer Support Department has initiated our disaster recovery protocol. The following actions have been taken to ensure business continuity:

  • A formal incident has been declared
  • Communication has been established with our service partner group
  • All members of the Support Organization have been notified
  • Alternate scheduling has been implemented in our Seattle Call Center to increase capacity
  • Alternate phone routing has been implemented to ensure coverage
  • A phone prompt has been implemented which notifies callers that hold times may be longer than usual

It is our anticipation that our service partner group will be able to resume operation by 6:00AM PST tomorrow morning with decreased capacity. The building which houses our service partner group is currently being inspected by engineers to ensure stability. Their power, water, and IT infrastructure are reported to be stable. We anticipate a minimum of 30% reduction in available service partner staff as people attend to their families and homes. We do not know at this point how long we anticipate the impact of this natural disaster to last.

This will impact DocuSign’s ability to respond to Web, Corporate, and Enterprise customers in a timely manner. Customers can expect to experience hold times which are longer than usual. This in turn will result with a larger portion of our call volume being directed to voicemail. We will return these voicemails as soon as possible. Email responses will be delayed as general volume increases. Chat availability will be limited as our ability to respond decreases.

For faster support response times, customers are encouraged to visit the DocuSign Community at http://community.docusign.com and DocuSign support site at www.docusign.com/support. More information will be posted as it becomes available.

Update 9/11/2013

On Friday, September 6, two of the three instances of DocuSign’s production service were impacted for 37 minutes by an inadvertent maintenance activity. The routine maintenance is normally performed without any impact to production. In this case, scripts were configured incorrectly and caused a rapid reboot of our storage systems. During these reboots, users experienced delays and in some cases session time outs. Measures have been taken to prevent this error in the future. We sincerely apologize for the service disruption and any impact to your business.

Update 7/29/2013

DocuSign is tracking malicious email campaigns that began on 7/29/2013. These emails are not associated with DocuSign. They are coming from unrelated, malicious third parties attempting leverage the DocuSign brand in the hopes of fooling recipients into opening the email and clicking on the links. In other versions of this type of spam we have also seen links to non-DocuSign sites as well as the .zip attachments. Always pay attention to the URL at the top of your DocuSign log-in. A DocuSign log-in page should begin with https://www.docusign.net.

Please remember to be particularly cautious if you receive an invitation to sign or view for an envelope you are not expecting. If you have received a copy of the malware spam email, DO NOT CLICK ANY LINKS or OPEN ANY ATTACHMENTS. Instead, forward the email to spam@docusign.com and then immediately delete the email from your system.

DocuSign's top priority is the privacy and security of our customers' information, documents, and data.

Update 7/17/2013

DocuSign is tracking malicious email campaigns that began on 7/17/2013. These emails are not associated with DocuSign. They are coming from unrelated, malicious third parties attempting leverage the DocuSign brand in the hopes of fooling recipients into opening the email and clicking on the links. In other versions of this type of spam we have also seen links to non-DocuSign sites as well as the .zip attachments. Always pay attention to the URL at the top of your DocuSign log-in. A DocuSign log-in page should begin with https://www.docusign.net.

Please remember to be particularly cautious if you receive an invitation to sign or view for an envelope you are not expecting. If you have received a copy of the malware spam email, DO NOT CLICK ANY LINKS or OPEN ANY ATTACHMENTS. Instead, forward the email to spam@docusign.com and then immediately delete the email from your system.

DocuSign's top priority is the privacy and security of our customers' information, documents, and data.

Update 6/7/2013

DocuSign is seeing malicious phishing email attacks as of this afternoon. In this round of malware spam email attacks, malicious third parties are including .zip attachments. These emails are not associated with DocuSign. They are coming from an unrelated, malicious third party attempting to copy our email style and language in the hopes of fooling recipients into opening the email and clicking on the attachments. In other versions of this type of spam we have also seen links to non-DocuSign sites as well as the .zip attachments. Always pay attention to the URL at the top of your DocuSign log-in. A DocuSign log-in page should begin with https://www.docusign.net.

Examples of the emails we have seen this afternoon all have the subject line of, "Please DocuSign this document: Important Changes – Employers Only..pdf"

Please remember to be particularly cautious if you receive an invitation to sign or view for an envelope you are not expecting. If you have received a copy of the malware spam email, DO NOT CLICK ANY LINKS or OPEN ANY ATTACHMENTS. Instead, forward the email to spam@docusign.com and then immediately delete the email from your system.

DocuSign's top priority is the privacy and security of our customers' information, documents, and data.

Update 5/15/2013

DocuSign is seeing malicious phishing email attacks as of this evening. In this round of malware spam email attacks, malicious third parties are including links to non-DocuSign sites which may include malicious code or redirect to non-DocuSign log-ins. These emails are not associated with DocuSign. They are coming from an unrelated, malicious third party attempting to copy our email style and language in the hopes of fooling recipients into opening the email and clicking on the links.

Examples of the emails we have seen this evening all have the subject line of, “Please DocuSign this document: Payment.pdf” and include links to non-DocuSign sites. Always pay attention to the URL at the top of your DocuSign log-in. A DocuSign log-in page should begin with https://www.docusign.net.

Please remember to be particularly cautious if you receive an invitation to sign or view for an envelope you are not expecting. If you have received a copy of the malware spam email, DO NOT CLICK ANY LINKS or OPEN ANY ATTACHMENTS. Instead, forward the email to spam@docusign.com and then immediately delete the email from your system.

Please remember, DocuSign’s top priority is the privacy and security of our customers’ information, documents, and data.

Update 5/7/2013

DocuSign is seeing malicious phishing email attacks as of this evening. In this round of malware spam email attacks, malicious third parties are including links to non-DocuSign sites which may include malicious code or redirect to non-DocuSign log-ins. These emails are not associated with DocuSign. They are coming from an unrelated, malicious third party attempting to copy our email style and language in the hopes of fooling recipients into opening the email and clicking on the links.

Examples of the emails we have seen this evening all have the subject line of, “Please DocuSign this document: Payment.pdf” and include links to non-DocuSign sites. Always pay attention to the URL at the top of your DocuSign log-in. A DocuSign log-in page should begin with https://www.docusign.net.

Please remember to be particularly cautious if you receive an invitation to sign or view for an envelope you are not expecting. If you have received a copy of the malware spam email, DO NOT CLICK ANY LINKS or OPEN ANY ATTACHMENTS. Instead, forward the email to spam@docusign.com and then immediately delete the email from your system.

Please remember, DocuSign’s top priority is the privacy and security of our customers’ information, documents, and data.

Update 4/9/2013

DocuSign became aware this morning of new malware phishing emails that are being sent as if coming from the DocuSign service. These emails are not coming from DocuSign. Please do not click on any links or attachments therein. They are coming from an unrelated, malicious third party attempting to copy DocuSign's email style and language in the hopes of fooling recipients into opening the email and downloading .zip attachments. While the DocuSign Global Network and our eSignature service remain safe and secure, we are proactively notifying customers and partners of the new phishing spam so that you can take appropriate measures to protect against spam.

Examples of the emails we have seen this morning all have the subject line of, “Completed: Please DocuSign this document : Payroll 2013..pdf” and have a .zip attachment titled Payroll.zip:
Spam Email Screenshot

Fortunately, much of this most recent malware spam never made it to users' inboxes as DocuSign has both Sender Policy Framework (SPF) lookup functionality and DMARC enabled on our mail servers to flag and quarantine malicious spam. The combination of these technologies helps to protect from malware spam attacks. You can learn more about SPF at http://www.openspf.org/ and DMARC at http://www.dmarc.org/index.html.

DocuSign actively works with antivirus vendors to fight spam. These vendors are continually updating their software to identify, filter, and remove this and other spam and malware from users’ systems. Please be sure that your antivirus and email filtering software are enabled and up-to-date. If you or one of your users opened the malicious attachment, be sure to contact your antivirus software provider for details on next steps and remedies, and/or follow your company's procedures for such incidents.

As a recipient, you can recognize safe, secure DocuSign links by hovering your mouse over them before you click on them to ensure that they start with: https://www.docusign.com or https://www.docusign.net. Any other links within emails made to look like DocuSign system emails are unsecure and unsafe. Additionally, DocuSign does not include .zip attachments in emails.

February 27, 2013 Update

DocuSign became aware this evening of new malware spam emails that are being sent as if coming from the DocuSign service. These emails are not coming from DocuSign. Please do not click on any links or attachments therein. They are coming from an unrelated, malicious third party attempting to copy DocuSign's email branding in the hopes of fooling recipients into opening the email and clicking on links and/or attachments. While the DocuSign Global Network and our eSignature service remain safe and secure, we are proactively notifying customers and partners of the new malware spam so that you can take appropriate measures to protect against spam. Fortunately, much of this most recent malware spam never made it to users' inboxes as DocuSign has both Sender Policy Framework (SPF) lookup functionality and DMARC enabled on our mail servers to flag and quarantine malicious spam. The combination of these technologies helps to protect from malware spam attacks. You can learn more about SPF at http://www.openspf.org/ and DMARC at http://www.dmarc.org/index.html.

DocuSign actively works with antivirus vendors to fight spam. These vendors are continually updating their software to identify, filter, and remove this and other spam and malware from users’ systems. Please be sure that your antivirus and email filtering software are enabled and up-to-date. If you or one of your users opened the malicious attachment, be sure to contact your antivirus software provider for details on next steps and remedies, and/or follow your company's procedures for such incidents.

As a recipient, you can recognize safe, secure DocuSign links by hovering your mouse over them before you click on them to ensure that they start with: https://www.docusign.com or https://www.docusign.net. Any other links within emails made to look like DocuSign system emails are unsecure and unsafe. DocuSign does not include .zip attachments in emails.

If you believe you or your customers received malware spam email, please forward the email to spam@docusign.com and then immediately delete it from your system. More information on this and other malicious malware spam email attacks – including a screen shot of the spoof email – can be found on the DocuSign web site at http://www.docusign.com/spam.

February 8, 2013 Update

DocuSign became aware this morning of new malware spam emails that are being sent as if coming from the DocuSign service. These emails are not coming from DocuSign. Please do not click on any links or attachments therein. They are coming from an unrelated, malicious third party attempting to copy DocuSign's email branding in the hopes of fooling recipients into opening the email and clicking on links and/or attachments. While we have not received any reports from DocuSign users having received this spam and the DocuSign Global Network and our eSignature service remain safe and secure, we are proactively notifying customers and partners of the new malware spam so that you can take appropriate measures to protect against spam.

DocuSign has both Sender Policy Framework (SPF) lookup functionality and Domain-based Message Authentication, Reporting & Conformance (DMARC) enabled on our mail servers to flag and quarantine malicious spam. The combination of these technologies helps to protect from malware spam attacks. You can learn more about SPF at http://www.openspf.org/ and DMARC at http://www.dmarc.org/index.html.

DocuSign also actively works with antivirus vendors to fight spam. These vendors are continually updating their software to identify, filter, and remove this and other spam and malware from users’ systems. Please be sure that your antivirus and email filtering software are enabled and up-to-date.

As a recipient, you can recognize safe, secure DocuSign links by hovering your mouse over them before you click on them to ensure that they start with: https://www.docusign.com or https://www.docusign.net.

Any other links within emails made to look like DocuSign system emails are unsecure and unsafe. Additionally, DocuSign does not include .zip attachments in emails.

If you believe you or your customers received malware spam email, please forward the email to spam@docusign.com and then immediately delete it from your system. If you or one of your users opened the malicious attachment, be sure to contact your antivirus software provider for details on next steps and remedies, and/or follow your company's procedures for such incidents.

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January 29, 2013 Update - Protecting Against Malware Spam Attacks

DocuSign's top priority is the privacy and security of your information, documents, and data. The Internet is a critical component to your business and to conducting business on the DocuSign Global Network. Those committing fraud seek to take advantage of trusted relationships for illegal purposes. While there is no foolproof way to prevent the unauthorized use of the DocuSign name and brand, we continuously monitor for such activity to make your DocuSigning experience safe and secure.

DocuSign strives to be a great partner and fight malware spam attacks and the malicious third parties behind malware spam. In the event that you have been impacted by malware spam email, we recommend contacting a security vendor like McAfee, Microsoft/Forefront, Symantec or others to help with any needed security support and system clean up.

You can help to combat online fraud and protect your information, documents, and data by taking the following precautions:

Enable Sender Policy Framework
DocuSign highly recommends that email administrators configure their email servers to utilize SPF (Sender Policy Framework) lookup functionality. Mail servers that utilize SPF lookup functionality will contribute to flagging and quarantining malicious spam. DocuSign leverages a best practice called DMARC which works with SPF to instruct recipient email servers how to treat malicious spam. The combination of these technologies dramatically helps to protect from malicious spam email. You can learn more about SPF at http://www.openspf.org/ and DMARC at http://www.dmarc.org/index.html.

Filter email attachments
Quarantine any emails from the Internet with potentially harmful attachments such as .zip and .exe file types.

Workstation security
Install anti-virus software and ensure it is enabled and kept up-to-date, and be sure to apply vendor recommended security patches on a frequent basis.

Education
Provide regular training to end users to identify fraudulent email and phishing schemes.

Please contact your systems security team and email administrator to encourage them to take advantage of these precautionary steps to help protect your information, documents and data.

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January 29, 2013 Update

DocuSign became aware this morning of new malware spam emails being sent as if it was coming from the DocuSign service. An example follows immediately below. These emails are not coming from DocuSign and you should not click on any links or attachments therein. They are coming from an unrelated, malicious third party attempting to copy DocuSign’s email branding in the hopes of fooling recipients into opening the email and clicking on links and/or attachments. While the DocuSign Global Network and our eSignature service remain safe and secure, we are proactively notifying customers of the new malware spam so that you can take appropriate measures to protect against spam.

Within this latest round of malware spam email attacks, the links included within the emails ARE NOT safe, secure links to the DocuSign service. As a recipient, you can recognize safe, secure DocuSign links by hovering your mouse over them before you click on them to ensure that they start with: https://www.docusign.com, https://www.docusign.net, https://na2.docusign.net or https://eu1.docusign.net.

Any other links within emails made to look like DocuSign system emails are insecure and unsafe. DO NOT CLICK these links. Examples of insecure and unsafe links that we have seen in malware spam emails to date include (but are not limited to):

http://www.lichtblick-optik.de
http://www.xeniastudio.hu/abridged/index.html
http://kozmetikapecel.hu/boxed/index.html
http://www.crofthandyreflexology.co.uk/klansman/index.html
http://kesharie.eu/treatable/index.html
http://superpowerfruits.com/fiddles/index.html
http://unterwegsinfrankreich.medianewsonline.com/sulkiest/index.html

If you believe you received malware spam email, please forward the email to spam@docusign.com and then immediately delete it from your system. More information on this and other malicious malware spam email attacks – including a screen shot of the spoof email – can be found on the DocuSign web site at https://www.docusign.com/spam.

Get helpful tips on protecting yourself from malware spam email from a recent blog post, "Protect Yourself From Online Fraud and Scams in the New Year", by DocuSign's Chief Security Officer.

example spam message

example spam message

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January 24, 2013 Update

At 8:40AM PST this morning, 1/24/2013, DocuSign became aware of new malware spam emails being sent as if it was coming from the DocuSign service. An example follows immediately below. These emails are not coming from DocuSign and you should not click on any links or attachments therein. They are coming from an unrelated, malicious third party attempting to copy DocuSign’s email branding in the hopes of fooling recipients into opening the email and clicking on links and/or attachments. Within this latest round of malware spam email attacks, the links included within the emails ARE NOT safe, secure links to the DocuSign service. As a recipient, you can recognize safe, secure DocuSign links by hovering your mouse over them before you click on them to ensure that they start with: https://www.docusign.com or https://www.docusign.net.

Any other links within emails made to look like DocuSign system emails are unsecure and unsafe. DO NOT CLICK these links. Examples of unsecure and unsafe links that we have seen in malware spam emails to date include (but are not limited to):

http://www.lichtblick-optik.de
http://www.xeniastudio.hu/abridged/index.html
http://kozmetikapecel.hu/boxed/index.html
http://www.crofthandyreflexology.co.uk/klansman/index.html
http://kesharie.eu/treatable/index.html
http://superpowerfruits.com/fiddles/index.html
http://unterwegsinfrankreich.medianewsonline.com/sulkiest/index.html

If you believe you received malware spam email, please forward the email to spam@docusign.com and then immediately delete it from your system. More information on this and other malicious malware spam email attacks – including a screen shot of the spoof email – can be found on the DocuSign web site at https://www.docusign.com/spam .

Get helpful tips on protecting yourself from malware spam email from a recent blog post, "Protect Yourself From Online Fraud and Scams in the New Year", by DocuSign's Chief Security Officer at https://www.docusign.com/node/3952.

example spam message

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January 3, 2013 Update

Malicious third parties are continuing to attempt to spoof a variety of companies, including DocuSign, via spam email. Antivirus vendors report malicious code incidents have been increasing by as much as 3600% per week in recent weeks. While the majority of spam emails are being sent to email accounts with no association to DocuSign or the DocuSign service, some have also been received by DocuSign users. The latest spam emails contain a zip file with an executable containing malicious code that installs malware on the recipient’s computer if opened. These spam emails are not coming from DocuSign and are not related to the DocuSign service. DO NOT OPEN THE ATTACHMENT.

DocuSign actively works with antivirus vendors including Symantec, McAfee, Microsoft Forefront, and Strasburg, to fight spam. Antivirus vendors are continually updating their software to identify, filter, and remove this and other spam and malware from users’ systems. Please be sure that your antivirus and email filtering software are enabled and up-to-date to protect your systems and personal information. If you opened the malicious attachment, be sure to contact your antivirus software provider for details on next steps and remedies, and/or follow your company’s procedures for such incidents.

DocuSign continues to aggressively investigate this incident and is working with law enforcement agencies to take further action. We have received questions from customers asking how a third party obtained their email addresses. Malicious third parties most often obtain email addresses by spidering the Internet, purchasing lists, and then “phishing” for personal information via phone calls, spam emails, or fake web sites that contain malicious viruses designed to capture email directories, contacts, and other personal data.

DocuSign’s top priority is the privacy and security of our customers’ information, documents, and data. DocuSign does not sell user information to any third party. For more information, please review DocuSign’s TRUSTe certified privacy policy at http://www.docusign.com/company/privacy-policy.

Please find below the immediate steps that you should take if you think you received malware spam email. Further below please find recommendations regarding steps that IT departments may wish to take to further protect against malware spam.

Immediate steps to take if you think you received malware spam email:

  1. DO NOT OPEN any zip files or executable attachments
  2. DocuSign-generated emails don’t contain zip files or executables as attachments
  3. Contact the sender to confirm the authenticity of the signature request if you don’t recognize the sender of a DocuSign envelope
  4. FORWARD the email to spam@docusign.com to help with our forensic efforts
  5. Immediately DELETE the malicious email
  6. Ensure your anti-virus software is up to date and enabled

Steps IT departments may wish to take to further protect against malware spam:

  • Enable Sender Policy Framework (SPF) record checking: SPF is an email validation system designed to prevent email spam by detecting email spoofing, a common vulnerability, by verifying sender IP addresses. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sender_Policy_Framework).
  • Filter email attachments: Quarantine any emails from the Internet with potentially harmful attachment file types such as zip and executable file types. The only attachments DocuSign will send are PDFs.
  • Workstation Security: Install anti-virus software and ensure it is enabled and kept up-to-date. Apply vendor recommended security patches on a frequent basis.
  • Education: Provide regular training to end-users to identify fraudulent email and phishing schemes.

More information will be posted here as it becomes available.